Tag Archives: London Design Festival

Trends for 2019/20

Buying everyday objects and clothes for a monthly subscription, limitations and bias of artificial intelligence, large-format 3D printing, furniture for very small apartments, a sense of privacy in the interiors, fascination with nature, chance and mistake – these are the trends that we will hear and talk more often in 2019 and 2020.

The signals of trends listed in this article appeared in 2018 at the following events: Ars Electronica (Linz), Biennale Interieur (Kortrijk), Dubai Design Week, Dutch Design Week (Eindhoven), Formex (Stockholm), imm (Cologne), London Design Festival, Maison & Objet (Paris), Milan Design Week, Mobile World Congress (Barcelona), Orgatec (Cologne) and Venice Architecture Biennale. I document them with over a hundred photos – all of them I took by myself.

 

1. Goods for a subscription.

A circular economy is not about “saving the world”, but about reducing production costs and reusing limited resources/materials and parts used to produce goods, and, in the long run, to sell the same good or its derivatives to many customers – one after another, every time for the exclusive use of a client. Trend: sale of items in the form of services for a monthly, fixed fees for the duration of the contract.

Swapfiets, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Swapfiets, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Swapfiets, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
MUD Jeans, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
MUD Jeans, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
MUD Jeans, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Gerrard Street, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Gerrard Street, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven

 

2. Imperfect and biased artificial intelligence.

Artificial intelligence recognizes (or rather: tries to recognize) objects, places and people, as well as emotions expressed on the face of a person and in a human voice. Artificial intelligence, however, has many limitations, makes mistakes and sometimes is biased, for example, when recognizing the age of people or selecting candidates for a job. Trend: human verification of decisions made by algorithms, as well as certification of algorithms by appointed independent organizations in terms of the degree of credibility of artificial intelligence and its susceptibility to the value systems of IT-people developing AI tools.

LG, Mobile World Congress 2018, Barcelona
LG, Mobile World Congress 2018, Barcelona
LG, Mobile World Congress 2018, Barcelona
LG, Mobile World Congress 2018, Barcelona
LG, Mobile World Congress 2018, Barcelona
USA pavilion, London Design Biennale/London Design Festival 2018
USA pavilion, London Design Biennale/London Design Festival 2018
USA pavilion, London Design Biennale/London Design Festival 2018
USA pavilion, London Design Biennale/London Design Festival 2018
USA pavilion, London Design Biennale/London Design Festival 2018
USA pavilion, London Design Biennale/London Design Festival 2018
Opacity, Mikhail Wertheim Aymès, Global Grad Show/Dubai Design Week 2018
Opacity, Mikhail Wertheim Aymès, Global Grad Show/Dubai Design Week 2018
Opacity, Mikhail Wertheim Aymès, Global Grad Show/Dubai Design Week 2018
Opacity, Mikhail Wertheim Aymès, Global Grad Show/Dubai Design Week 2018
Opacity, Mikhail Wertheim Aymès, Global Grad Show/Dubai Design Week 2018
Opacity, Mikhail Wertheim Aymès, Global Grad Show/Dubai Design Week 2018
Opacity, Mikhail Wertheim Aymès, Global Grad Show/Dubai Design Week 2018

 

3. (Very) large 3D printing.

3D printing significantly increases the scale. Trend: robots print bridges, exhibition halls, buildings and furniture.

MX3D Bridge, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
MX3D Bridge, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
MX3D Bridge, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
A part of MX3D Bridge, Ars Electronica 2018, Linz
A part of MX3D Bridge, Ars Electronica 2018, Linz
Cloud Village, Chinese pavilion, Venice Architecture Biennale 2018
Cloud Village, Chinese pavilion, Venice Architecture Biennale 2018
Cloud Village, Chinese pavilion, Venice Architecture Biennale 2018
Cloud Village, Chinese pavilion, Venice Architecture Biennale 2018
Digital Chaiselongue, Philipp Aduatz, Milan Design Week 2018
Digital Chaiselongue, Philipp Aduatz, Milan Design Week 2018
Digital Chaiselongue, Philipp Aduatz, Milan Design Week 2018
Digital Chaiselongue, Philipp Aduatz, Milan Design Week 2018
Digital Chaiselongue, Philipp Aduatz, Milan Design Week 2018
Chaise Longue, Arwin Hidding & team, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Chaise Longue, Arwin Hidding & team, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Chaise Longue, Arwin Hidding & team, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Chaise Longue, Arwin Hidding & team, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Chaise Longue, Arwin Hidding & team, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Chaise Longue, Arwin Hidding & team, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Ai Build, Digital Design Weekend/London Design Festival 2018
Ai Build, Digital Design Weekend/London Design Festival 2018
Ai Build, Digital Design Weekend/London Design Festival 2018
Ai Build, Digital Design Weekend/London Design Festival 2018
Ai Build, Digital Design Weekend/London Design Festival 2018
Ai Build, Digital Design Weekend/London Design Festival 2018
Data Stool, Henri Canivez, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Data Stool, Henri Canivez, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Data Stool, Henri Canivez, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Data Stool, Henri Canivez, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Data Stool, Henri Canivez, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven

 

4. (Very) small apartments.

There are more and more people in the world, and the population density in cities is increasing. Trend: a compact, multi-functional furniture designed for small (and very, very small) apartments.

Sanwa, Salone del Mobile Milano 2018
Sanwa, Salone del Mobile Milano 2018
Sanwa, Salone del Mobile Milano 2018
Sanwa, Salone del Mobile Milano 2018
Sanwa, Salone del Mobile Milano 2018
Sanwa, Salone del Mobile Milano 2018
Sanwa, Salone del Mobile Milano 2018
Bross Italia, Salone del Mobile Milano 2018
Bross Italia, Salone del Mobile Milano 2018
Tiny Home Bed, Yesul Jang, Global Grad Show/Dubai Design Week 2018
Tiny Home Bed, Yesul Jang, Global Grad Show/Dubai Design Week 2018
Assembly, Yu Li, Global Grad Show/Dubai Design Week 2018
Assembly, Yu Li, Global Grad Show/Dubai Design Week 2018
Shelves, Jinho Han, Global Grad Show/Dubai Design Week 2018
Shelves, Jinho Han, Global Grad Show/Dubai Design Week 2018
Shelves, Jinho Han, Global Grad Show/Dubai Design Week 2018

 

5.  A sense of privacy.

Past: closed pods/booths that cut us off users from the outside world. Trend: furniture integrated with high acoustic panels or curtain systems with varying degrees of transparency of the fabric. They provide a sense of privacy and increase acoustic comfort, but do not isolate users from their environment.

BuzziSpace, Alain Gilles, Orgatec 2018, Cologne
BuzziSpace, Alain Gilles, Orgatec 2018, Cologne
BuzziSpace, Alain Gilles, Orgatec 2018, Cologne
BuzziSpace, Alain Gilles, Orgatec 2018, Cologne
BuzziSpace, Orgatec 2018, Cologne
Noti, Studio Ganszyniec, Orgatec 2018, Cologne
BoConcept, Orgatec 2018, Cologne
Ahrend Loungescape Powernap, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Ahrend, UNSwivel, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
Ahrend, UNSwivel, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven

 

6. Style: nature, chance, error.

A few tips for designers and interior stylists for the coming two years. Trends: untouched materials created by nature put on large surfaces, small wooden and stone parts on the handles, as well as patterns that do not refer to nature, but are created in processes that can not be fully controlled or are created as a result of machine error.

Reliance Veneer, 100% Design/London Design Festival 2018
The Kettel, Biennale Interieur 2018, Kortrijk
The Kettel, Biennale Interieur 2018, Kortrijk
The Kettel, Biennale Interieur 2018, Kortrijk
The Kettel, Biennale Interieur 2018, Kortrijk
Magna Natura, London Design Fair/London Design Festival 2018
Magna Natura, London Design Fair/London Design Festival 2018
Stelton, Formex 2018, Stockholm
CEA, Biennale Interieur 2018, Kortrijk
THG Paris, Downtown Design/Dubai Design Week 2018
Barrier and Ground Vase, Ragna Ragnarsdóttir, Formex 2018, Stockholm
Globule, Ragna Ragnarsdóttir, Formex 2018, Stockholm
Poured Collection, Troels Flensted, Formex 2018, Stockholm
Layers, Troels Flensted, Formex 2018, Stockholm
Pulpo, imm 2018, Cologne
Pascale Mestre, Maison & Objet 2018, Paris
Pascale Mestre, Maison & Objet 2018, Paris
Pascale Mestre, Maison & Objet 2018, Paris
The Production of Fatigue, Léa Mazy, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
The Production of Fatigue, Léa Mazy, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
The Production of Fatigue, Léa Mazy, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven
The Production of Fatigue, Léa Mazy, Dutch Design Week 2018, Eindhoven

 

Do you like this article about trends for 2019/20? Maybe you think that I deserve a cup of coffee (or two)? Wherever you are, you can donate a small sum of money using your PayPal account or credit card. All donations will help me to finance my journeys to fairs, festivals and conferences about design and new technology – this is where I find news for my website. Just click the rectangular button below to perform a secure transaction. Thank you for your support, it will help me to take a step forward and write new posts.

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The green facade means the green energy

One of the elements of the exhibition “Engineering the World: Ove Arup and the Philosophy of Total Design” held at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, and presenting the most important projects realized so far by global company Arup, is the SolarLeaf photobioreactor. The green, living facade of a building that produces microalgae and thermal energy, has left far behind all the other products, prototypes, and concepts presented at this year’s London Design Festival.

SolarLeaf is a photobioreactor (PBR) to be used as a facade of a building. Its role is to produce heat energy and microalgae. The construction of the SolarLeaf panel is quite simple: it is comprised of four glass layers. The outer ones form argon-filled insulation barriers that prevent heat loss.

The inner two glass layers form the 24-litre cavity that holds drinking water (culture medium) and green microalgae. Like other plants, microalgae – single-celled organisms, no larger than bacteria – draw on sunlight as an energy source and use it, together with CO2 and the nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus, to build up biomass in the photosynthesis process. This is is a pure source of renewable energy.

solarleaf-vam-credits-trendnomad
SolarLeaf green panels are the part of the exhibition “Engineering the World: Ove Arup and the Philosophy of Total Design” held at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Photography by TrendNomad.com

Inside the photobioreactors, microalgae are continuously supplied with liquid nutrients and carbon dioxide via a separate water circuit running through the façade of a building. In the result, microalgae can divide themselves up to two times a day and thus increase their biomass by a factor of four. Their biomass contains 23-27 kJ of energy per gram dry weight.

To avoid the microalgae sinking and remaining in suspension, the culture medium is continuously stirred by the supply of compressed air into the PBR – it works through an airlift. The high flow velocities along the inner surfaces of the bioreactor, and the lattice-like beads (scrapers) enclosed within it, inhibit the deposition of microalgae and biopollution.

At the same time, the façade collects energy by absorbing the light that is not used by the microalgae and generating heat, like in a solar thermal unit.

IBA, BIQ Algenhaus
The BIQ residential building erected in Hamburg in 2013 is the first building in the world to have a bioreactor facade. The microalgae are cultivated in flat panel glass photobioreactors measuring 250 x 70 x 8 cm. In total, 129 modules arranged in groups have been installed on the south west and south east faces of the residential building. Picture by IBA Hamburg GmbH/Bernadette Grimmenstein

The biomass and heat generated by the façade of the BIQ building are transported to the heart of the system – the plant room, which is a fully automated energy management center, where solar thermal heat and algae are harvested. The heat energy produced is directly available to the house and is distributed for various uses: heating, and preheating of hot water. Excess heat energy is stored in borehole heat exchangers (80 metre-deep holes filled with brine), from which energy is drawn with heat pumps as required.

The biomass resulting from the growth of the algae is automatically harvested through an algae separator and collected in a temperature-controlled container. After the separation, most of the culture medium is returned to the PBR. Only a small amount of the culture medium is removed from the system and discharged via a drainage arrangement into the public sewer.

Erstbefuellung und Vorstellung des Algenhauses (BIQ) mit der IBA Hamburg GmbH
Photography by IBA-Hamburg GmbH/Johannes Arlt

Harvested biomass is removed to a biogas plant, where it is conversed into methane. The conversion of biomass to methane is not done on site, because the necessary technology is not yet ready for use in residential buildings, or is difficult from a legal point of view. Instead, it is carried out externally in a biogas plant.

The advantage of biomass is that it can be used flexibly for power and heat generation, and it can be easily stored with virtually no energy loss, as well as it doesn’t require expensive storage technologies like batteries.

Moreover, cultivating microalgae in flat panel PBRs requires no additional land-use and isn’t unduly affected by weather conditions – the system can be operated all year long. The temperature in the PBR is kept constantly below 40°C in the summer and above about 5°C in the winter.

algae-material-at-vam-credits-trendnomad
Compared with soil-grown plants, algae produce up to five times as much biomass per hectare. Depending on the season and requirements, the algae can be used in different ways according to demand. It can be converted into heat in winter and, in the summer months when growth is highest, this biomass can be used as raw material for cosmetic and pharmaceutical products or is used for animal food or dietary supplements. Photography by TrendNomad.com

The approx. 200 square meter main algae façade comes with a net annual energy yield of about 4500 kilowatt-hours of electricity. This is somewhat more than an average household consumes in a year (3500 kilowatt-hours per year). In the BIQ building, there are 15 apartments, so only one of them could in principle be completely supplied with electricity from the bioreactors.

However, a much larger proportion of the apartments can be provided with heat, hence the bioreactor façades are used for heat generation (6000 kilowatt-hours per year) and not for producing electricity. This corresponds approximately to the supply of four apartments with heat, from the bioreactors alone. That means SolarLeaf provides around one-third of the total heat demand of the 15 residential units in the BIQ house.

Beyond residential architecture, the SolarLeaf photobioreactor façade system is suitable for a variety of different types of both new and existing buildings: industrial and commercial constructions, buildings for public infrastructure and trade.

The SolarLeaf façade system is the result of three years of research and development by Colt International based on a bio-reactor concept developed by Strategic Science Consult of Germany (SSC Ltd) and design work led by Arup.

arups-exhibition-at-vam-credits-trendnomad
Photography by TrendNomad.com

The exhibition “Engineering the World: Ove Arup and the Philosophy of Total Design” can be seen at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London until 6 November. Photos and videos of many other projects presented at the London Design Festival, which ran from 17 to 25 September, are available on my Instagram profile.

Main picture by IBA-Hamburg GmbH/Johannes Arlt.

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